Contact

Phone: 612-230-6400
Emailinfo@minneapolisparks.org

Park Hours

6 am-midnight

Off-Leash Dog Park Permit

You need to buy a permit before you bring your dog(s) to an Off-Leash Dog Park.

Dog Parks


Locations & Permits

Off-Leash Dog Park Permit

You need to buy a permit before you bring your dog(s) to an Off-Leash Dog Park.

Your permit is valid at all seven dog parks.

Minneapolis residents must get a City of Minneapolis Pet License for each dog before applying for an Off-Leash Permit.

You must vaccinate your dog(s) for rabies before buying an Off-Leash Dog Park Permit.

Permit Fees

Annual Permit

Minneapolis Residents
$35 first dog
$25 each additional dog

Non-Minneapolis Residents
$60 first dog
$35 each additional dog

Daily Permit

Residents/Non-Residents
$5 for each dog

You may also call or visit Park Board Headquarters to buy a permit.

Or, complete and submit a permit application [PDF] with payment by mail.

Rules

Off-Leash Dog Park Rules

Handlers must observe the following rules when inside Off-Leash Dog Parks (OLDPs).

  1. Handlers must individually leash their dogs except when inside a designated OLDP. 
  2. All handlers must possess an Off-Leash Dog Park Permit [PDF] for their dog(s).
  3. Off-leash dog parks are open during regular park hours of 6 am-10 pm.
  4. Dogs declared as dangerous animals under city code or potentially dangerous under state statutes may not use OLDPs.
  5. Dogs in heat may not use OLDPs. 
  6. No more than three dogs per handler permitted at one time.
  7. Handlers must have their dog(s) under control at all times and may not let their dog(s) out of sight.
  8. An attending adult must closely supervise all children.
  9. Handlers must leash dog(s) at the first sign of aggression or unruliness.
  10. Handlers must always clean up after their dog(s). 
  11. OLDPs are governed by Ordinance PB2-33 and City of Minneapolis Ordinances 64.50 and 64.55, . Handlers must observe all other ordinances, rules and regulations.

In the event of an emergency, aggressive dog or criminal activity, dial 911.

All reports about dog bites and attacks will be reviewed to determine whether the aggressive dog will be declared dangerous under state statue or city ordinance. If such a declaration is made, we will immediately revoke the off-leash permit.

Tips

Off Leash Dog Park Tips

  • Make sure your dog has a license, an off-leash permit, and all vaccinations.
  • Bring fresh water for your dog(s) to drink; Do not allow your dog to drink any standing water.
  • Extend common courtesy to all other dog park users.
  • Pick up after your dog and bring a spare dog bag to share.
  • Do not let dogs defecate in the Mississippi River.
  • Do not bring food or dog toys into off-leash dog parks as these items may create a conflict.
  • Do not bring glass containers into off-leash dog parks.

Canines for Clean Water

Canines for Clean Water

More than 100,000 dogs reside in Minneapolis, and tens of thousands of dogs from outside the City accompany their owners to enjoy Minneapolis parks. Dog owner decisions to pick up – or not pick up – after their pet, directly impacts the health (and beauty) of our water bodies.

Impact of Dog Waste in Our Water

Dog waste has been declared a "nonpoint source of pollution" by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Believe it or not, this puts dog waste in the same category as oil and toxic chemicals.

Improperly disposed pet waste negatively impacts water quality in lakes, ponds, creeks and the river. Pet waste that decays in lakes depletes oxygen. The lack of oxygen combined with warm temperatures can result in fish kills. Nutrients in pet waste also encourage weed and algae growth further reducing water quality. Algae blooms are stinky and make the water green and ugly which results in fewer recreational users including swimmers, boaters, wind surfers and anglers.

Improperly disposed pet waste can also make water unsafe for swimming. Diseases and parasites that can be transmitted from pet waste to humans include cryptosporidium (causes diarrhea, stomach cramps, nausea and dehydration in humans), camplyobacteriosis (causes diarrhea in humans), and toxocariasis (roundworms in humans). While pet waste isn't the biggest pollutant to our water bodies, it is one of many small sources that add up to a bigger problem. Dog owners can help tackle this bigger problem by picking up after their hound.

This program is made possible by the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board and the City of Minneapolis.

Contact
MaryLynn Pulscher
Phone: 612-313-7784
Email: dogs@minneapolisparks.org