NPP20: Year One Capital Investment Highlights

Posted on October 24, 2017

Athletic fields, swimming pools, playgrounds, basketball courts and more are renovated and replaced as part of new long-term plan.

As construction season winds down, MPRB shares updates on five of the first neighborhood parks to see capital investment projects with NPP20 funding. 

The parks are among those with the highest "equity rankings": These numbers are assigned to parks each year and are calculated using seven data-driven criteria that focus on racial and economic equity [PDF]. This equity-ranking system - the first of its kind in the U.S. - ensures that capital investments are targeted first in the parks and neighborhoods where they are needed the most. 

In addition, the highlighted parks are in south Minneapolis, due to last year's approval of the South Service Area Master Plan. Long-term plans are or soon will be in development for neighborhood parks throughout the rest of Minneapolis.

central gym community engagement

Central Gym Park

$1,100,000 in NPP20 funding allowed for investments in this park that otherwise would have been put on hold. Community members selected elements from the park’s long-term master plan to be realized, and after design and bidding this winter, construction is slated to begin in spring 2018. Central Gym Park's equity ranking is 3. 

bossen field park after construction

Bossen Field Park

An extensive overhaul that began last year was boosted with $737,500 in NPP20 funds in 2017. That allowed lighting for four athletic fields and irrigation and sod for two others, plus construction of a basketball court. In addition, NPP20 rehabilitation funds restored and upgraded the restroom building. Bossen Field Park's equity ranking is 4.

peavey park basketball courts under construction

Peavey Park

This project had been limited to about $600,000 worth of investments. But thanks to $1,000,000 in additional NPP20 funds, an entire second phase was added: In spring 2018, construction begins on a new multi-use field, playground and central path through the park. Pictured here is the basketball court complex currently under construction. Peavey Park's equity ranking is 10.

phillips pool under construction

Phillips Community Center/Phillips Aquatics Center

On track to open in late winter or spring of 2018, the aquatics center will serve as MPRB's only year-round indoor pool. Thanks to $725,000 in NPP20 funding, construction on this project got underway sooner than it would have otherwise. Additional NPP20 funds for rehabilitation allow for security upgrades - including the pilot installation of a keyless entry system that will eventually be used throughout the park system. Phillips Community Center’s equity ranking is 6.

powderhorn park wading pool

Powderhorn Park

This project was already underway when NPP20 was approved. The $75,000 in NPP20 funding went toward additional enhancements for three playgrounds that were renovated, as well as the wading pool renovation. In 2021, a $1.1 million NPP20 allocation will fund a park-wide renovation. Powderhorn Park’s equity ranking is 13. 

 ... and that's just the start! 

  • Through 2022, another 24 neighborhood parks have NPP20 capital investment funding allocated through MPRB's current capital improvement program. These parks, together with those highlighted above, have the highest rankings on NPP20's equity matrix for 2017 [PDF]. 
  • Building on the South Service Area Master Plan, long-term plans are in development for neighborhood parks in North and Northeast/Southeast Minneapolis, and soon will be for Southwest Minneapolis. These long-term plans will help determine NPP20-funded capital investments for Folwell, Bassett’s Creek, Jordan and North Commons parks, among others.

In addition, neighborhood parks across the system will benefit from NPP20-funded rehabilitation projects and increased maintenance.

Every neighborhood deserves a great park.

NPP20 is a historic agreement between the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) and the City of Minneapolis. NPP20 helps address racial and economic equity across 160 neighborhood parks and provides $11 million annually to maintain, repair and replace facilities.